In the Term Wiki assignment, students design an engaging, easy-to-follow wiki that reviews research on a
specific question in the field of screen media and socio-cognitive development.

Example term wikis


Looking for examples of what a term wiki can look like? Follow the links below. Keep in mind that not all of these wikis are necessarily "A" work. Think about the things that the authors of these wikis do right and wrong, then use that information to make your wiki the best it can be.


List of term wikis for Spring 2015


Add the research question that your term wiki will address to the list below. Your question should link to your term wiki's team home page. For example...

  1. What's the relationship between bilingualism and extra-sensory perception? by Jeremy Boyd
  2. What's the relationship between bilingualism and creativity? by Fatima Guardado
  3. What is the relationship between bilingualism and the onset of Alzheimer's disease? by Sonia Vasquez
  4. What is the relationship between bilingualism and problem-solving? by Tran Nguyen
  5. What is the relationship between bilingualism and code-switching? by Catherine Liu
  6. What language should psychotherapy sessions with bilinguals be conducted in? by Brooke Loree
  7. What's the relationship between bilingualism and creativity? by Bri Luczak
  8. How does bilingualism affect verbal fluency? by Jessica Chen
  9. What is the relationship between bilingualism and gesture use? by Jiaxi Wang
  10. What is the relationship between bilingualism and cognitive reserve? by Jessica Torres
  11. How does bilingualism improve attention control? by Jocelyne Mansilla
  12. How does bilinguals' ethnolinguistic and cultural identity change and develop due to bilingualism? by Elly Lim
  13. What is the relationship between bilingualism and speech therapy? by Leanne Li
  14. What are benefits of dual-language classrooms? What is the difference in gained advantage for monolinguals versus bilinguals? by Olivia Murray
  15. Is bilingualism associated with higher income in the job market? by Sandra Magallon
  16. What is the relationship between bilingualism and creativity? by Stephanie Zepeda
  17. Does cultural priming in the first language affect second language processing? by Lydia Fong
  18. Does grammatical gender affect linguistic relativity in bilinguals? by Melissa Milano
  19. What are the best second language classroom practices for effective language learning? by Freda Chamberlain
  20. What is the relationship between bilingualism and autism? by Stacy Bernstein

Note that the home page that link number 1 leads to has hyperlinks to a bunch of different content: an annotated bibliography, an outline, the actual wiki page, and slides from an in-class presentation on the wiki content. Your home page should look like this by the end of the quarter.

Term wiki assignment guidelines


Content


  • Is the research question appropriate for course requirements? That is, does it have something to do with research that's been conducted on the course topic?
  • Does the wiki summarize and synthesize important features of research that has been done on the research question? Does it give lay readers an idea of the methods that have been used to address the research question? Of the results that researchers have reported?
  • Does the wiki critique the research that is reviewed? Does it point out strengths and weaknesses in methodology and logic?
  • Is the wiki organized thematically (good), or is it organized on an article-by-article basis (not so good)?
  • Is all information included in the wiki factually accurate?

Audience Design


  • Is the wiki organized to make comprehension as easy as possible for readers? Is it designed to effectively engage reader interest and facilitate reader learning?
    • Introduction
      • Is a clear, concise statement of the research question (what your wiki is about) made in the introduction?
      • Does the introduction effectively engage readers by spelling out the broader implications of the research question, and/or explaining how it might impact their lives?
      • Does the introduction forecast the structure of the remainder of the wiki? That is, does it provide a roadmap for readers to follow?
    • Body
      • Does the body of the wiki stick to the roadmap? Is it made clear to readers that different sections of the body are addressing themes mentioned in the roadmap?
      • Is it clear what each paragraph is about and how each paragraph relates to themes that the roadmap has promised to address?
    • Conclusion
      • Does the conclusion provide a brief summary of the main themes discussed in the body of the wiki?
      • Does the conclusion suggest possibilities for future research based on shortcomings noted in the body of the wiki?
  • Will lay readers be able to understand terminology used in the wiki? Is the use of technical terms kept to a minimum? If there are terms and concepts that lay readers likely won't understand, are they effectively explained?
  • Does the wiki effectively engage reader interest and facilitate reader learning using media like figures, audio, video, polls, and hyperlinks to other content?
  • Is the significance of the media that are used made clear to the reader? That is, are media explained in the main text of the wiki and in captions?

Formal Features


  • Has the Term Wikis page on the class homepage been edited to include a direct hyperlink to your team's term wiki homepage?
  • Does your team's term wiki homepage include a hyperlink to your wiki?
  • Are the authors’ names and email addresses listed at the top of the wiki? Are the email addresses hyperlinked so that readers can click on them to send the authors email?
  • Is the publication date listed at the top of the wiki? This is the date that you most recently made changes to the wiki.
  • Does the wiki cite at least six articles that report research bearing on the research question? Do in-text citations and your References section follow APA format?
  • Has the wiki text been submitted on TED to Turnitin.com? Is the Turnitin similarity index at or below 10%?
  • Is the wiki free of grammar, spelling, and punctuation errors?
  • Is the wiki around 2,400 words (range: 2,100-2,700), excluding bibliographic references and captions?

Feedback assignment



Each student has until 11:59pm on 5/28 to read three different term wikis and provide feedback aimed at helping the authors improve their wiki. Use the "Discuss" field at the bottom of each wiki page to post your feedback. To receive full credit you need to provide a minimum of two "Good" comments, and two "Needs Work" comments for each of the three pages that you're assigned to read. Good comments should point out features of a page that work well. Needs Work comments should point out aspects of the page that need to be improved. See the instructor comments at the bottom of each article wiki for example Good and Needs Work comments.

You will not receive credit for comments that provide vague feedback like "Really easy to read!" or "Needs to be organized better." Instead, be as specific as possible. For example, you might say "The figure you provide and the description of it in the main wiki text make it really easy to follow what's going on in the Anderson et al. experiment" or "I'm having trouble understanding what's going on in the second section of the wiki. Maybe if you talked about the logic behind these studies first, it'd make more sense to readers when you later on start talking about the results." Note that you're providing at least 12 substantial comments (minimum of four comments for three different wikis = 12). This means that if you provide vague feedback in just two of your comments your grade on the assignment will fall to a B- (10/12 = 83%). It pays to provide substantive feedback!

The "Feedback" columns in the table below show which wikis you've been assigned to read and provide feedback on. For example, Stacy is responsible for the wikis numbered 2, 3, and 4 in the section above called "List of term wikis for Spring 2015".

Last Name
First Name
Feedback1
Feedback2
Feedback3
Bernstein
Stacy
2
3
4
Chamberlain
Freda
5
6
7
Chen
Jessica
11
9
10
Fong
Lydia
8
12
13
Guardado
Fatima
14
15
16
Li
Leanne
17
18
19
Lim
Eun
20
2
3
Liu
Catherine
4
8
6
Loree
Brooke
7
5
9
Luczak
Briana
10
11
12
Magallon
Sandra
13
14
18
Mansilla
Jocelyne
16
17
15
Milano
Melissa
19
20
2
Murray
Olivia
3
4
5
Nguyen
Tran
6
7
8
Torres
Jessica
9
13
11
Vasquez
Sonia
12
10
14
Wang
Jiaxi
15
16
17
Zepeda
Stephanie
18
19
20

Class presentations



During the last week of the quarter students will be doing in-class slideshow presentations covering the research presented in their term wikis. The guidelines for presentations are nearly identical to those listed above in the "Term wiki assignment guidelines" section. That's because the term wiki and presentation assignments are essentially the same. In both cases you're attempting to explain a complex literature to your audience. In both cases you need to think about the best way to engage audience members to facilitate their understanding of the material you're presenting. And in both cases you're going to make judicious use of media--pictures, audio, and video--to get your point across.

There are a few notable differences though:

  • Your audience for presentations is not a lay audience--everyone is already generally familiar with the course topic.
  • There's a strict limit (five minutes plus two minutes for questions) on the amount of time you have to explain what you want to explain.
  • The media you use must be embedded in your slideshow. Switching from your slideshow to media located elsewhere (on webpages, for example) will slow down your presentation, which is a problem given the time limits.

All slideshows will be run from my computer to save time. You must send me your slides or a link to them prior to the class period that you're presenting in. After presenting your slideshow in class you must also post it to your term wiki home page. Go here to see some examples showing how this can be done.

One final note on participation points during the last week. Students who are presenting on a given day will automatically receive their participation point for the day. Everyone else will have to ask questions during the Q&A session after each presentation in order to get their point.

Presentation sign-ups


Students should sign up for a presentation slot by editing the list below:

Tuesday, 6/2
  1. Jocelyne Mansilla
  2. Bri Luczak
  3. Olivia Murray
  4. Sonia Vasquez
  5. Catherine Liu
  6. Tran Nguyen
  7. Sandra Magallon
  8. Lydia Fong
  9. Stephanie Zepeda
  10. Jessica Torres

Thursday, 6/4
  1. Stacy Bernstein
  2. Freda Chamberlain
  3. Jessica Chen
  4. Fatima Guardado
  5. Melissa Milano
  6. Jiaxi Wang
  7. Brooke Loree
  8. Elly Lim
  9. Leanne Li

Example slides from past presentations



Term wikis from past quarters